Adpatations on Adaptations.

When Dashiell Hammett originally wrote THE THIN MAN, he was drawing less on his real-life experiences as a private detective for the famous Pinkerton Agency, and more from his long-term relationship with Lillian Hellman, to whom the novel is originally dedicated. Like any good writer, Hammett pulled experiences from his own life. This allowed him to populate the worlds of the genre he is largely credited with inventing, the hard-boiled detective novel.

 "Lillian Hellman in 1935 | Public Domain"

"Lillian Hellman in 1935 | Public Domain"

Yet THE THIN MAN is better remembered as a movie - and later series of movies - starring William Powell and Myrna Loy. The 1934 film adaptation was created soon after the publication of the novel, with MGM paying Hammett $21,000 US for the rights to his work. The first indicator that the film would have a tonal shift from the source material was in the people hired to adapt the book into a screenplay: married couple Albert Hackett and Frances Goodrich. It's telling that the relationship between Nick and Nora Charles is more equitable in the film than in the book, though Nora remains distanced from much of the core story, serving as a foil to her husband.

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And our own Lucia Frangione has taken her own role in adapting the novel to the stage. Fragione further expanded on Nora's role to add complexities in racial politics. Said Frangione, "An element that was in the original novel and the film was the fact that Nora and Nick were a married couple with no children who spent their Christmas with strangers. Both joy and sorrow hold a couple together, so as a writer I had to ask myself, 'Why are they socially isolated?' Hammett and Hellman were outsiders because of race and politics. So, I decided to flesh out a story point that was already hinted at in the novel and film. Nora is a wealthy heiress from San Francisco, why couldn't she be Chinese? I have always sought intelligent ways to diversify my casts. We live in a multi-racial society, that should be reflected on stage."

Across these adaptations - Hammett adapting aspects of his own life, Goodrich and Hackett adapting and refining Hammett's work while adding their own experiences, and now Frangione adapting aspects of current affairs to mix while further expanding Nora's role in the story - THE THIN MAN remains a landmark work in the detective genre. Nick and Nora remain one of the few - if only - famous detective couples to hit the stage, the big screen, the small screen, and the page. And audiences love sharing in their adventures at every step.

 Curt McKinstry, Nadien Chu, Set By Scott Reid, Costumes by Deitra Kalyn, Lighting by Anton De Groot. Photo by Trudie Lee.

Curt McKinstry, Nadien Chu, Set By Scott Reid, Costumes by Deitra Kalyn, Lighting by Anton De Groot. Photo by Trudie Lee.